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Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Rehabilitation Workshop

No Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation workshop is currently scheduled.  We expect to offer the next TDCS workshop in spring of 2020.

Join the NC NM4R Community to be notified of upcoming workshops.

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of neurostimulation that uses constant, low current delivered to the brain area of interest via electrodes on the scalp. Transcranial direct current stimulation is a relatively simple technique requiring only a few parts, and works by sending constant, low direct current through the electrodes. When these electrodes are placed in the region of interest, the current induces intracerebral current flow. This current flow then either increases or decreases the neuronal excitability in the specific area being stimulated based on which type of stimulation is being used. This change of neuronal excitability leads to alteration of brain function, which can be used in various therapies as well as to provide more information about the functioning of the human brain.

This workshop will explore the fundamental physics of tDCS and the neurophysiology and neurochemistry potentially effected by tDCS. Participants will gain experience with common tDCS devices, electrode placement skills and montages, and best practices, all with an eye to crucial safety considerations. We will explore potential applications of the technique in stroke rehabilitation, pain management, and other in other clinical conditions. Goals include workshop participants gaining a basic understanding of the state of clinical knowledge in tDCS, developing a working knowledge of responsible experiment design, and acquiring essentials skills on the use of various tDCS devices.

 

Advanced Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (TDCS) Workshop
DRAFT Agenda

Wednesday, March 27, 2019—Basic Principles and Methods in Healthy Individuals

8:00–8:30 Breakfast and registration

8:30–9:00 Welcome to NC NM4R & historical perspective of NM4R (Steve Kautz, Ph.D.)

9: 00–12:00 Didactic training (Colleen A. Hanlon, Ph.D.; Pratik Chhatbar M.D., Ph.D.; John Kindred, Ph.D.)

In this 3-hour module we will cover:
9:00–10:00 Fundamental physics and principles of TDCS (Dr. Chhatbar)
Neurophysiology and neurochemistry potentially effected by TDCS
10:00–11:00 Common experimental parameters: amplitude, position of the anode versus, dose response effects (Dr. Hanlon)
11:00–11:15 Coffee break
11:15–12:15 Applications of TDCS in other motor control disorders and rehabilitation (Dr. Kindred)
TDCS for gait: lessons learned and why we are now using HD-TDCS

12:15–1:00 Lunch (provided)
Discussion of your interests and general Q&A (Dr. Hanlon)

1:00–2:00 Demonstration of best practices (Dr. Hanlon, William DeVries, Shayla Lester)

2:00–4:30 Hands-on training (Dr. Hanlon, William DeVries, Shayla Lester, Georgia Mappin)

In this 2.5-hour module participants will break into groups to address the following questions:
•How do I turn this thing on? A primer on common TDCS devices.
•Are we there yet? Standardized electrode placement skills
•How do I place these pads? Practicing different montage arrangements
•What’s the difference between conventional and high density TDCS?
•Participants will have the opportunity to participate in a study and collect data.

4:30–5:00 Review and wrap up for the day

5:30–7:00 Meet and greet NM4R faculty reception (Atrium, College of Health Professions Building A, 151 Rutledge Avenue)
 

Objectives
Develop a working knowledge of the physics behind TDCS
Develop a working knowledge of the influence of electrode placement on brain activity
Acquire essential skills on the use of various TDCS devices
Learn safety parameters and considerations


Thursday, March 28, 2019—Clinical Applications and Considerations for Patients

8:00–8:30 Breakfast and announcements

8:30–9:00 Review and in-class quiz regarding information learned on Monday

9:00–12:15 Didactic Training (Dr. Hanlon; Jeffrey Borckardt, Ph.D.; Wayne Feng, M.D.)

In this 3-hour module we will cover:
9:00–10:00 Applications of TDCS in stroke rehabilitation (Dr. Feng)
10:00–11:00 Combining TDCS with other interventions or technologies (Dr. Borckardt)
11:00–11:15 Coffee Break
11:15–12:15 Applications of TDCS in other cognitive conditions (Dr. Hanlon)
Important experimental design considerations (the “primed brain is more plastic” principle)

12:15–1:00 Lunch (provided)
Discussion of commercially available TDCS equipment and general Q&A

1:00–2:00 New frontiers in noninvasive brain stimulation techniques (Bashar Badran, Ph.D.)

2:00–4:30 Hands-on training (Dr. Hanlon, William DeVries, Shayla Lester, Georgia Mappin)

In this 2.5-hour module participants will break into groups to address the following:
•How do I turn this thing on? A primer on common TDCS devices.
•Are we there yet? Standardized electrode placement skills
•How do I place these pads? Practicing different montage arrangements
•Why can’t I keep using this sponge? Best practices for electrode care
•What’s the difference between conventional and high density TDCS?
•Analysis of collected data on Day 1

4:30–5:30 tDCS for sleep disorders (Greg Sahlem, M.D. Ph.D.)

5:30-6:00 Closing of tDCS workshop and evaluations

Objectives
Develop a working knowledge of the clinical research in TDCS
Develop a working knowledge of responsible experimental design
Acquire essential skills on the use of various TDCS devices

 

This workshop is free of charge to all accepted applicants.  Due to our funding by United States Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development under award number P2CHD086844, we must restrict admission to the workshops to those applicants who are affiliated with US-based institutions and who are eligible to receive NIH funding.

The National Center for Neuromodulation for Rehabilitation (NC NM4R) is supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under award number P2CHD086844. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.