Approved Online SLP Prerequisite Courses by State

List of States

Arizona

Arizona State University

Anatomical and Physiological Bases of Speech (SHS 310)

Noncadaveric study of anatomical systems that underlie human speech and language, including respiration, phonation, articulation, and related nervous system processes.

Speech and Language Acquisition (SHS 465)

Speech and language development in the normal child.

Introduction to Phonetics (SHS 250)

Introduces English phonetics with emphasis on phonetic transcription, articulation, phonology, and disorders of speech.

Speech Science (SHS 375)

Normative aspects of speech, hearing, and language.

Northern Arizona University

A&P of Speech and Language (CSD 251)

This course will introduce students to anatomy and physiology (structure and function) relevant to human communication and swallowing. This course will primarily focus on the typical child and adult, which will facilitate comprehension of disorders and atypical conditions covered in later coursework.

Communication Development in Children (CSD 350)

This course covers typical development of language and literacy from birth through later adolescence, with additional emphasis placed on cultural and linguistic differences.

Phonetics (CSD 202)

Introduction to the description and classification of speech sounds with a focus on American English. Topics include articulatory phonetics, segmental and suprasegmental descriptions of speech production, dialectal variation, and speech sound development. Students will use the International Phonetic Alphabet to transcribe speech patterns of children and adults.

Speech-Language Sciences (CSD 375) & Hearing Science (CSD 376)

This course will provide a basic understanding of the processes involved in normal speech production and perception. Content will include the physics of sound, sound spectrography, the physiological bases of respiration, voice production, and resonance of the vocal tract, acoustic and physiological phonetics, perception of consonants and vowels, and the neural control of speech.

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California

California State University San Marcos

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (SLP 320)

Explores the anatomy and physiology of speech and hearing including respiration, phonation, resonance, articulation and perception. An introduction to the central and peripheral nervous system also is provided.

Language Development and Assessment for Practitioners (SLP 251)

Serves as a general introduction to the study of language acquisition and assessment. Principles of typical and atypical first and second language acquisition will be examined. Students will read and explore how theoretical viewpoints and evidence-based practice influences their approach to acquisition and assessment of typical and atypical language development. Students will gain “explicit” knowledge in language assessment and analysis techniques of natural speech.

Clinical Phonetics (SLP 391)

Students learn to describe, analyze and transcribe typically produced and disordered speech sounds. The importance and application of phonetic transcription in the assessment of individuals with communication disorders is examined. Students will learn techniques for citation and intelligibility assessment. Knowledge of typical and disordered development is incorporated to aid in diagnostic and therapy decisions. Students analyze child and adult speech samples to differentially diagnose articulation and phonological disorders.

The Science of Speech and Hearing (SLP 357 *OR PHYS 357)

This course provides a foundation in speech science with application for research and clinical application in communication sciences and disorders. Students will learn the fundamental processes underlying the production and perception of speech and the psychological and acoustic aspects of sound and its measurement. Normal physical processes and principles underlying speech and hearing will serve as a framework for understanding abnormal functioning. Clinical applications will be used to demonstrate the importance of speech science in relation to clinical practice.

San Diego State University

A & P of Speech (SLHS 321)

Anatomy and physiology of respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory systems related to speech.

Foundations of Speech-Language: Development (SLHS 513)

Speech-language development as related to theories of language acquisition, development, and clinical practice in children from birth to school-age.

Phonetics (SLHS 320)

Principles of speech production and practical skills in discriminating and transcribing sounds of various dialects in English and other languages, as well as clinical populations. Competency in IPA broad and narrow transcription, classification of speech sounds, and patterns of speech

Introduction to Language Science (SLHS 300)

Structure, acquisition, processing, and neurological organization of language in typical and disordered communication

Introduction to Hearing Sciences (SLHS 305)

Concepts of hearing science. Hearing science components to include physical acoustics, anatomy and physiology of auditory system, and psychoacoustics.

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Colorado

University of Northern Colorado

A & P of Speech and Hearing Mechanism (ASLS 267)

Structure and function of the speech and auditory/vestibular mechanisms.

Normal Speech and Language Development (ASLS 266)

Normal speech and language development and their relationship to other aspects of child development.

Introduction to Phonetics (ASLS 260)

Characteristics of American English speech sounds and the International Phonetic Alphabet symbols used to represent them. Normal phonological development.

Fundamentals of Physiological and Biological Acoustics (ASLS 343)

The physics of sound as it relates to speech and hearing.

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Connecticut

Sacred Heart University

A & P of Speech and Swallowing (CMD 300)

Students will become familiar with the anatomical and physiological bases of human communication and swallowing, including the support structures of the respiratory, articulatory phonatory, and swallowing systems, and the identification and function of muscles in these systems.

Development of Language (CMD 330)

This course will introduce students to the social, biological, perceptual, and cognitive bases of language. A range of theories of language acquisition will be presented and the impact of nature and nurture on children's development will be discussed. The typical sequence of language acquisition in the areas of phonology, semantics, syntax and pragmatics will be presented. The relations between oral language development and the acquisition of literacy will be emphasized. Dialectical variations in language development and second language learning will be highlighted.

Phonetics (CMD 210)

Students will be introduced to the acoustic and articulatory properties of the sound systems of human languages. The International Phonetic Alphabet will be presented, and students will learn to record speech in broad phonemic transcription. Variations among regional and cultural US dialects, as well as notation and practice of narrow phonetic transcription will be introduced. The implications of cultural and linguistic differences on speech production will be discussed.

Speech Science (CMD 320)

This course presents an introduction to the physics and psychology of human speech production and perception. It covers basic acoustics, the glottal sound source, resonance and acoustics of the vocal tracts, acoustic features of vowels, consonants, and suprasegmentals of speech, as well as the physics and biomechanics of phonation, articulation, and resonance and the instruments, applications, and programs used to assess speech production. Principles and models of speech perception, with special emphasis on categorical perception, will also be discussed.

University of Connecticut

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech, Hearing, and Swallowing (SLHS 2203)

A study of the anatomic and physiologic bases for the development and use of speech, language, and hearing. The course focuses on the central and peripheral auditory mechanisms of the human body, and on the respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory mechanisms required for speech production. The course includes a laboratory section.

Speech and Language Acquisition (SLHS 2204)

An examination of early language development research in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Theories of language acquisition and implications for practice are examined. Particular attention is given to the role of adults in language development and to the relationship between language development and cognitive development.

Phonetics Introductions to Phonetic Principles (SLHS 3247)

A study of phonetic theories and the use of International Phonetic Alphabet symbols in analyzing, categorizing, and transcribing the sounds of the world's languages, focusing on American English. The course emphasizes understanding the processes involved in the production of specific phonemes. The laboratory section of the course focuses on developing students' skills in broad and narrow transcription.

Speech and Hearing Sciences (SLHS 2156Q)

An introduction to speech physiology and the instrumentation used to measure physiologic aspects of speech. Topics include a basic understanding of the acoustic theories of speech production, experience in acoustic instrumentation, recording, and analysis equipment and procedures, an overview speech perception, and clinical applications of the speech science theories, instrumentation, and procedures.

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Florida

University of South Florida

A & P of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (SPA 3101)

The neurological and anatomical basis of communication disorders. Comparisons of normal and pathological organic structures and their functional dynamics.

Introduction to Language Development and Disorders (SPA 3004)

This course introduces theoretical concepts and research findings concerning the normal developmental process of language learning as a basis for differentiating developmental delay or disorder of language.

Applied Phonetics in Communication Sciences & Disorders (SPA 3112)

Introduction to phonetic analysis of normal and disordered speech, including training in phonetic transcription of normal and disordered speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Introduction to Speech Science (SPA 3011)

Concentrated study of the acoustic, physiological and perceptual aspects of sound as related to normal and pathological speech communication. Introduction to instrumentation and measurement procedures.

Jacksonville University

Speech Anatomy and Physiology (CSD 206)

This course introduces elementary anatomy, physiology and neurophysiology of the speech production mechanism

Speech and Language Development (CSD 205)

This course provides an overview of typical speech and language development. This information provides a basis for understanding atypical development, delays, and disorders of speech and language in children.

Phonetics (CSD 204)

This course provides intensive training in the use of the International Phonetics Alphabet for transcribing American English in typical and disordered speech.

Acoustics (CSD 302)

An introduction to scientific methodologies, physics of sound and elementary instrumentation related to human speech communication.

Florida International University

Advanced Human Anatomy & Physiology of Mechanisms of Communication (SPA 5102C Lecture SPA 5102L Lab)

Advanced study of anatomy, physiology, and neurology mechanisms of speech and hearing. Includes system study of speech production and perception: respiration, phonation, articulation, audition.

Normal Communication Development & Disorders (SPA 5009C)

Advanced study of the processes of typical speech and language acquisition as the basis for Graduate Catalog 2019-2020 Nicole Wertheim College of Nursing and Health Sciences 573 understanding associated developmental speech and language disorders.

Advanced Applied Phonetics (SPA 5113C)

Advanced study of principles of phonetics and phonetic transcription via International Phonetic Alphabet. Physiological descriptions and classification of speech sounds.

Acoustics of the Sciences of Speech and Hearing (SPA 5150C)

Advanced study of the communication sciences associated with the process of speech and hearing, including speech perception and production, speech and hearing physiology, and acoustic phonetics.

Florida Atlantic University

A & P of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (SPA 4101)

Study of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system, auditory system, and head and neck related to the production of speech and hearing.

Normal Processes of Speech and Language Development (LIN 4710)

Phonological, semantic, syntactic and pragmatic sequence and processes in the normal development of speech and language.

Clinical Phonetics for Communication Disorders (SPA 5113)

Students learn how to identify the phonemes of Standard American English as well as dialectical differences and child developmental differences. In addition, students learn to transcribe connected speech and changes based on foreign accent influences in order to identify normal versus disordered speech.

Speech and Hearing Science (SPA 4011)

Study of the physiological, acoustical, and perceptual bases of speech and hearing; the mechanics of phonation, audition, vocal theory, consonant production; the acoustic and physiologic study of speech output and auditory reception.

Nova Southeastern University

A & P of the Speech-Language and Hearing Mechanisms (CSAD 3020)

This course is an introduction to the anatomy and physiology of the auditory and vocal mechanisms.

Speech Language Development (CSAD 3030)

Study of prelinguistic and psycholinguistic variables related to normal development from infancy through adolescence.

Phonetics (CSAD 3010)

This class will cover the study of the history, theory and application of phonetics. Students review sampling and transcription techniques and applications to clinical practice.

Hearing and Speech Science (CSAD 3050)

This course covers the nature of sound, sound transmission, and units of measurement necessary to understand the physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual parameters of hearing and speech production. A basic review of instrumentation and technology available and utilized in speech, hearing, and language research, intervention and assessment is provided.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Speech Anatomy & Physiology (SPA 3101)

Introduces elementary anatomy, physiology and neurophysiology of the speaking mechanism.

Language Development (SPA 4004)

Study of language-based disorders of communication: language impairment in children, traumatic brain injury, aphasia and dementia.

Phonetics (SPA 3003)

Introduces human speech production, classification, and transcription. Also provides intensive training in the use of the International Phonetics Alphabet for transcribing American English.

Speech Acoustics (SPA 3011)

Introduces scientific methodologies, physics of sound, acoustics and elementary instrumentation related to human speech communication.

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Hawaii

University of Hawaii

Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (CSD 431)

Overview of the structures and functions of the speech, language, and hearing system used for communication and swallowing.

Speech and Language Development (CSD 433)

Provides an understanding of children’s acquisition of speech, language, and normal communication development from birth through adolescence.

Phonetics (CSD 432)

An introduction to the fundamentals of phonetic and phonological development, transcription of speech sounds, analysis, interpretation, and cultural variation.

Acoustics and Psychoacoustics of Speech and Hearing (CSD 434)

Provides an understanding of the fundamental processes underlying the production and perception of speech, as well as the physical and psychological aspects of sound and their measurement.

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Idaho

Idaho State University, Pocatello

A & P of Speech and Swallowing Mechanism (CSD 3350)

Introduction to the anatomy and physiology of speech production and swallowing. Examination of structures and functions related to respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, mastication, and dugulation. Focus on typical structures and processes and atypical structure and processes in populations with speech and swallowing disorders.

Language Development & Disorders (CSD 3335)

Study of the development of phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, pragmatics and relevant nonverbal and cognitive aspects of language. Review of current theories and research. Includes etiology and characteristics of primary, secondary and acquired language disorders in children. PREREQ: CSD 3330, or permission of instructor.

Clinical Phonetics and Phonology (CSD 3321)

Basic concepts in applied phonetics and phonology, emphasizing applications in communication disorders and differences. Introduction to International Phonetic Alphabet.

Speech Science: The Acoustical Nature of Sound and Speech (CSD 3310)

Introduction to the nature and acoustical properties of sound and sound: generation, propagation, and modification. Explores speech production and characteristics of speech acoustics as they relate to typical and atypical speech production and perception. Speech production subsystems of respiration, phonation, articulation, and resonation are examined in detail through the analysis of acoustic and physiological data. Examines seminal and contemporary theories of speech production and perception, research findings, clinical applications, and measurement and analysis of typical speech and voice production and perception.

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Kentucky

Western Kentucky University

Speech Anatomy and Physiology (CD 484)

Designed to help students identify the structures and functions which comprise the speech and hearing mechanism. The relation of this mechanism to the production and development of speech and language will be addressed.

Speech and Language Development (CD 481)

Introduction to development of speech and language across the lifespan with emphasis on comprehensive child development. Topics include development of speech and language, play, cognition, socialization, and emerging literacy.

Applied Phonetics (CD 405)

Study of distinctive feature systems that classify consonants and vowels, the definitions of phonological process terminology, and practice in broad and narrow transcription of words and connected speech.

Science of Speech and Hearing (CD 347)

Overview of the linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic variables of speech and hearing. Basic orientation to instruments for measuring acoustic parameters.

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Massachusetts

Bridgewater State University

Speech A & P (COMD 281)

This is an introduction to the study of the anatomy and physiology of systems involved in speech, language and hearing, and their relationships to disorders of communication.

Language Acquisition and Development (COMD 290)

This course is an overview of the normal language acquisition and development process through the life span. Emphasis will be placed on children from birth through school age. Theories of language development, rules systems of English, stage of language development, individual and cultural differences, prevention of language problems, and techniques for collecting and analyzing a language sample will be addressed.

Phonetics (COMD 294)

Analysis and transcription of speech sound systems are included in this course.

Speech and Hearing Science (COMD 282)

This is an introductory course as it relates to normal aspects of speech, hearing and language. Physiological elements of speech production, speech acoustics, auditory physiology and the psychophysics of sound reception are included in this course.

Emerson College

Speech and Hearing Anatomy and Physiology (CD 234)

Studies the structure of the biological systems that underlie speech, language, and hearing with an emphasis on the processes and neural control of respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Clinical disorders are used to elucidate dysfunction of these normal processes as substrates for human communication.

Language Acquisition (CD 201)

Explores the theoretical and practical aspects of the language learning process and its relation to other aspects of cognitive and social development. Includes discussion of the development of speech and language skills throughout the life span, from birth to adulthood.

Phonetics (CD 233)

Studies the various aspects of speech sounds and their production with a focus on articulatory, acoustic, and linguistic bases. Students learn to discriminate, analyze, and transcribe speech sounds using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The relevance of course content to clinical and other applications is discussed as students learn to use the IPA to transcribe the speech of individuals with communicative impairments and different social dialects and accents.

Speech Science (CD 403)

Presents core concepts and terminology relating to physiological processes and acoustic features of speech production and perception. Acoustic phonetics is emphasized, including the physics of sound and inferences about voicing and resonance features of speech sounds from sound spectrograms. Students have exposure to instrumentation for acoustic analysis.

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

A & P I: The Speech and Hearing Mechanisms (COMM-DIS 211)

The anatomical and physiological bases of normal speech and hearing processes, including respiration, phonation, articulation, and hearing. Knowledge gained serves as a prerequisite for understanding disorders of these systems.

Speech and Language Development (COMM-DIS 301)

The emergence of speech and language milestones in English-speaking children with emphasis on the development of phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics, and how these aspects of language may be influenced by cognitive development.

Phonetic Processing (COMM-DIS 213)

The sound system of English and, to a lesser extent, those of other languages. Phonemes, allophones, phonological rules, and historical changes in the English language. Phonetic universals in comparison to English phonetics. Reading and writing English words and sentences using the International Phonetic Alphabet, including special symbols used for coarticulation, dialects, disorders, and infant vocalizations.

Introduction to Speech Science (COMM-DIS 312)

The acoustic characteristics of speech, their analysis, and their relevance for speech perception.

Introduction to Hearing Science (not offered online) (COMM-DIS 214)

Time and frequency description of acoustic signals. Physiology of the peripheral and central auditory systems. Topics in psychoacoustics, including methodology, absolute and differential sensitivity, loudness, pitch, frequency and intensity resolution, and binaural hearing.

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Michigan

Calvin University

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech, Hearing, and Language Mechanisms (SPAUD 210)

A study of the anatomic and physiologic bases for the development and use of speech, language, and hearing. The course focuses on the central and peripheral auditory mechanisms of the human body, and on the respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory mechanisms required for speech production. The course includes a laboratory section.

Child Language Development (SPAUD 311)

An examination of early language development research in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. Theories of language acquisition and implications for practice are examined. Particular attention is given to the role of adults in language development and to the relationship between language development and cognitive development.

Phonetics (SPAUD 216)

A study of phonetic theories and the use of International Phonetic Alphabet symbols in analyzing, categorizing, and transcribing the sounds of the world's languages, focusing on American English. The course emphasizes understanding the processes involved in the production of specific phonemes. The laboratory section of the course focuses on developing students' skills in broad and narrow transcription.

Speech Science (SPAUD 217)

An introduction to speech physiology and the instrumentation used to measure physiologic aspects of speech. Topics include a basic understanding of the acoustic theories of speech production, experience in acoustic instrumentation, recording, and analysis equipment and procedures, an overview speech perception, and clinical applications of the speech science theories, instrumentation, and procedures.

Hearing Science (SPAUD 218)

An introduction to hearing and hearing science. Topics include the physics of sound, the anatomy and physiology of the human auditory system, and the psychophysics of human hearing.

Michigan State University

A & P of the Speech and Hearing Mechanisms (CSD 213)

Structural and functional analyses of the central and peripheral auditory mechanisms, and of the respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory mechanisms for speech.

Oral Language Development (CSD 333)

Development of receptive and expressive aspects of child language.

Descriptive Phonetics (CSD 232)

Principles of speech production. Transcription of speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Speech Science (CSD 313)

Processes underlying the production and perception of speech.

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Minnesota

Minnesota State University (Moorhead)

Anatomy and Physiology of Normal Speech and Hearing (SLHS 202)

The study of the anatomy and basic physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms, and the major underlying scientific concepts.

Language Development (SLHS 204)

Nature and normal development of cognitive, linguistic and social systems of language in children.

Linguistic Phonetics (SLHS 201)

The science and theory behind the production and perception of the sounds of the English language; Introduction to Clinical and Linguistic Phonetics; the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) including vowel and consonant symbols, diacritical markings, and stress/intonation; application of phonemic analysis and an introduction to phonology and phonological principles including discrimination of normal and disordered sound productions; Introduction to anatomy and physiology of sound production.

Speech and Voice Science (SLHS 421)

The study of speech acoustics and physiology, incorporating both voice and articulatory aspects of speech signal production, as well as the instrumentation needed for measurement of speech acoustic signals.

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Missouri

Maryville University

A & P of Speech (CMSD 310)

Phonetics is designed to introduce students to the study of speech sounds, with an emphasis on American English. Participants will learn how American English speech sounds are produced and how to transcribe using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Both broad and narrow transcription will be addressed. The clinical processes for articulation and phonological disorders will be discussed. Characteristics of regional and social dialects will be addressed

Language and Speech Acquisition (CMSD 330)

This course is designed to provide an overview of typical American English language development, including major American dialects. Child language is placed in the context of social, motor, and cognitive development from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on the crucial relationship between language development and literacy acquisition. Participants use basic language observation and analysis techniques to explore phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics and pragmatics.

Phonetics (CMSD 210)

Phonetics is designed to introduce students to the study of speech sounds, with an emphasis on American English. Participants will learn how American English speech sounds are produced and how to transcribe using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Both broad and narrow transcription will be addressed. The clinical processes for articulation and phonological disorders will be discussed. Characteristics of regional and social dialects will be addressed.

Speech and Hearing Science (CMSD 220)

This course will address the science behind assessment and treatment in the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology. Participants will apply the basic concepts underlying the production and analysis of speech sounds to clinical practice.

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Montana

University of Montana

Anatomy & Physiology of the Speech & Hearing Mechanisms (BIOH 330)

Introduction to anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms including the anatomical orientation and embryological development, the breathing mechanism, structures of phonation, articulators, audition and the nervous system.

Speech and Language Development (CSD 210)

Topics include typical speech and language development, phonology, semantic, morphological, syntax, and pragmatics, along with individual differences, second language acquisition and literacy.

Phonological Development & Phonetics (CSD 320)

Exploration of the sounds and sound structure of American English and some of its dialects. Introduction to the theory and practice of phonetic and phonological analysis and trained in the transcription of speech into the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Speech Science (CSD 420)

Physiologic, neurologic, and acoustic aspects of human communication, theoretical framework for speech science, and principles of acoustics applied to speech language pathology across the lifespan.

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New Jersey

Seton Hall University

A & P of Speech and Swallowing Mechanism (GMSL 5005)

This course provides a thorough introduction of the anatomy, physiology, and neural underpinnings as it relates to the speech production/perception and swallowing mechanism (includes an introduction to anatomical terminology and basic elements of anatomy as well as respiratory, laryngeal, and articulatory anatomy, including resonance and deglutition). Emphasis will be placed on anatomy. Topics related to speech science, the normal swallow process, and clinical applications of this content will also be discussed.

Language Development (GMSL 5003)

This course is an in-depth introduction to language development. It prepares students for a variety of applications within education, speech-language pathology and psychology course of studies. Course content includes a definition of language and how language fits within the larger domain of communication. Students complete formal analyses of each of the five domains of language (pragmatics, semantics, phonology, morphology, syntax) to gain a thorough understanding in how each domain comprises language as a whole. The course focuses on expressive language but receptive language (comprehension) is introduced. The developmental course of language in the first 5 years is delineated in detail and students become familiar with important language milestones the child passes through. Language development in the school-age and adolescent years is also presented. Students gain understanding of the nature (i.e., innate) and nurture factors (i.e., environmental) that influence language development. Important theoretical constructs and their history as the understanding of development has evolved are reviewed.

Phonetics ( GMSL 5001)

This course is designed to provide instruction and practice in the study of phonetics. The main goals of the course are: (a) to provide knowledge and understanding of the phonetic system of the English language; (b) to demonstrate proficiency in transcription skills using the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA); and (c) to apply this to typical and atypical populations in connected speech.

Hearing and Speech Science (GMSL 5006)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental concepts of acoustics, and psychoacoustics of sound and speech, and the anatomy and physiology of the peripheral and central auditory mechanisms. Pathological conditions that affect those mechanisms are also introduced.

Kean University of NJ

A & P of the Ear and Speech Mechanism (CDD 2260)

An introductory study of the basic structures and functions of the speech and auditory mechanisms.

Early Speech and Language Development (CDD 2256)

Developmental processes and behavioral sequences related to speech and language acquisition in children from birth to 5 are studied. Biological, cognitive, motor, psychosocial, environmental, and cultural factors in interactions are examined as determinants of language and use

Phonetics (CDD 2254)

Study of the sound patterns of spoken language; phonetic transcription; acoustic aspects; theories of phonological, development, phonological processes; application to disorders of articulation and dialectical differences.

Speech and Hearing Science (CDD 3271)

An introduction to the biological production and reception of human speech.

Monmouth University

A & P of Speech and Hearing (SLP 302)

Provides an understanding of the anatomical structures, as well as the physiological and functional mechanisms essential for speech production. Specifically, the anatomy and physiology of respiration, phonation, articulation, resonation, and hearing will be covered in depth.

Introduction to Language Development (SLP 202)

Provides an overview of the development of language over the course of the lifespan. An introduction to the normal acquisition of language including the components of language, as well as the physical, social, and cognitive basis for language. Theories of language development and how language evolves from infancy to adulthood will be discussed. Cultural influences on language development will also be explored.

Introduction to Phonetics (SLP 301)

Provides students with the skills needed to produce, transcribe and describe in articulatory terms, the individual sounds used in speech. Will provide an introduction to sound patterns, phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic-Alphabet, acoustic aspects of phonetics and the application of these skills to clinical practice. Dialects and derivations of the English language will be explored

Speech and Hearing Science (SLP 401)

Studies the nature of sound, sound transmission, and units of measurement necessary to understand the physiologic, acoustic, and perceptual parameters of speech. Acoustics, speech production, and speech perception will be emphasized

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Nebraska

University of Nebraska, Kearney

A & P of the Speech Mechanism (CDIS 252)

Study of the anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism.

Normal Language Development (CDIS 261)

This course provides an introduction to and exploration of the processes by which humans acquire and use spoken and written language, including comprehension, expression, and development (progression & growth).

Introduction to Phonetics (CDIS 215)

Vocal mechanism and the International Phonetic Alphabet. Designed to develop skill in the use of IPA and in the analysis of defective speech sounds.

Speech and Hearing Science (CDIS 335)

Introduction to the process of human speech communication. Acoustic and physiological aspects of speech production, hearing, and speech perception are presented along with an overview of instrumentation in speech pathology and audiology.

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New Mexico

Eastern New Mexico University

Speech-Language-Hearing Anatomy and Physiology (CDIS 300)

Structure and function of speech and hearing mechanisms including respiration, phonation, articulation, resonation, hearing and neurology.

Speech and Language Development (CDIS 330)

Understanding of speech/language learning process/theory in the child, adolescent and young adult years; phonological/ articulatory phonetic, morphological, semantic, syntactic and pragmatic taxonomic aspects of speech/language development explored; physical, cognitive and social development as related to speech and language acquisition/ organization.

Phonetics/Phonology (CDIS 310)

The study of phonetics; the position, movements and acoustic properties of speech sounds and introduction to the International Phonetic Alphabet and diacritics; primary emphasis on transcription training for normal speech, disordered speech and dialectally influenced speech.

Speech and Hearing Science (CDIS 400)

Advanced science course in normal speech production and perception. Topics include the evolution of speech, research in speech production and perception, acoustics, acoustic phonetics, laboratory instrumentation and computer applications.

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New York

CUNY, Lehman College

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech (SPV 247)

Anatomy, physiology, and neurophysiology of the speech and vocal mechanism; physiological studies of speech.

Language Acquisition (SPV 321)

Study of speech, language, and communication skills in typically developing children. Exploration of gender, multicultural, multilinguistic, and socioeconomic variations in language development. Analysis of the processes involved in language learning and use and the foundations of language and literacy from infancy through the school-age years to complex language development over the lifespan.

Articulatory Phonetics (SPV 245)

Fundamentals of articulatory phonetics; descriptive analysis of spoken forms of American English and other languages.

Speech and Hearing Sciences (SPV 349)

Foundations in the physics and bioacoustics of speech production and perception, measurement of fundamental quantities, the anatomy and physiology of the central auditory pathways, and introduction to psychoacoustics and theories of speech production and speech perception; and application to typical speech and hearing and communication differences and disorders.

Molloy College

A & P of Speech and Hearing (SLP 2710)

A study of the anatomical and physiological functions of the systems underlying the production of speech and the processes of swallowing, respiration, phonation, articulation and central and peripheral nervous systems.

Normal Language Development (SLP 3720)

The course focuses on the normal development of language and the linguistic, social and cognitive aspects contributing to the process of first-language acquisition. Field studies of emerging language required.

Phonetics and Vocal Patterns (SLP 2730)

The study of the articulatory and acoustic characteristics of phonemes as part of the structure of language with emphasis on IPA phonetic transcription and diacritics.

Sound and the Auditory Mechanism (SLP 2700)

The anatomy and physiology of the auditory mechanism; theories of hearing, characteristics of sound and their measurement.

SUNY at New Patlz

A & P of Speech and Swallowing (CMD 310)

Basic anatomy and embryological development of language and speech. The course also provides basic understanding of the physiology of respiration, articulation, phonation, and swallowing.

Language Development in Children (CMD 306)

The nature of speech and language development in young children.

Phonetics (CMD 302)

The sounds of speech, their manner of production, their combinations and diacritical marks, and phonetic symbols. Training in the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet.

Speech and Hearing Science (CMD 304)

Principals of Acoustic phonetics, anatomy and physiology of hearing, perception of sound and speech.

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North Carolina

North Carolina Central University

A&P of Speech and Hearing (EDSH 5710)

This is an introduction to the anatomical and physiological aspects of the speech mechanism. Both normal and pathological aspects of respiration, phonation, resonation, and articulation are studied.

Speech and Language Development (EDSH 5700)

An introductory course dealing with the study and understanding of the normal aspects of human communication. Emphasis is on development of normal speech and language, their neurological, physiological, and behavior components.

Phonetics (EDSH 5730)

An introduction to the study of the perception and production of the vowels, diphthongs, and consonants of spoken American English, employing an adapted version of the IPA. The focus is on broad transcription of normal and disordered speech.

Scientific Bases of Speech (EDU 4760)

This is a survey of the physiological and acoustical aspects of speech production, its transmission, and reception. Specific information regarding the processes of respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and audition is covered.

University of North Carolina, Greensboro

A & P of Speech and Hearing (CSD 309)

Anatomical and physiological bases of human communication.

Language and Speech Development (CSD 308)

Theory and evidence of the chronological development of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics in the child.

Introduction to Phonetics (CSD 306)

Recording of speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet in broad transcription. General American Dialects and Translations

Speech and Hearing Science (CSD 307)

Acoustic principles of speech and hearing; analysis of the acoustic characteristics of speech and physiological correlates; speech perception. This course is divided into three sections: Acoustics of sound, Speech acoustics, and Spectrographic analysis.

Western Carolina University

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism (CSD 380)

Study of the anatomic structures involved in speech and their function in the speech process.

Speech and Language Development (CSD 301)

Speech and language development in normal children; survey of procedures and tools used to study language development and acquisition.

Phonetics (CSD 370)

Study of sound feature production; phonetic transcription

Acoustics and Speech Science (CSD 372)

Study of the anatomic structures involved in speech and their function in the speech process.

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Ohio

Miami University

Anatomy of Speech and Hearing (SPA 222)

Introduction to anatomical, physiological, and neurological characteristics of normal speech mechanisms; developmental embryology; and fundamental acoustics of speech.

Theories of Language Development (SPA 223)

MPF Survey of the integration of scientific and theoretical knowledge about the normal acquisition of language from birth to adulthood. Introduction to the linguistic aspects of cultural, political, and environmental impacts on acquisition of language, relationship between English and coexistent languages, gender-related differences in conversational interactions, and the complex interaction of culture and language development.

Phonetics (SPA 334)

Sound structure of the English language, beginning and advanced transcription using international phonetic alphabet with clinical applications

Speech and Hearing Science (SPA 435)

History, current status, and future trends of the scientific aspects of speech production and reception.

University of Cincinnati

A & P of Voice and Speech Production (CSD 2010)

Anatomy and physiology of the systems of respiration, phonation, articulation, and neurology for voice, speech and swallowing.

Phonetics (CSD 2071)

An introduction to the study of speech sounds used in the production of American English. Anatomy & physiology of the speech mechanism along with phonetic/phonological terminology are introduced for the purpose of describing typical and disordered speech sound production. Students will get training with pronunciation and phonetic transcription (International Phonetic Alphabet) throughout the course which is a vital component of prerequisite knowledge necessary for graduate programs in communication disorders.

Speech and Language Development (CSD 3080)

This course focuses on all aspects of speech and language from a developmental perspective with an emphasis on language analysis across listening, speaking, reading, writing, and social communication. The course provides a foundation for differentiating between children who are developing typically and those who are not.

Speech and Hearing Science (CSD 4020)

This course covers the acoustics of speech and applications of this knowledge to disorders of speech and hearing.

University of Akron

A & P of Speech and Hearing (7700: 365)

Study of the anatomy and physiology of organs directly and indirectly responsible for production of speech and perception of acoustical signals.

Introduction to Clinical Phonetics (7700: 210)

Introduction to International Phonetic Alphabet. Transcription of normal speech. Overview of articulatory and acoustic phonetics. Introduction to distinctive features.

Language Science & Acquisition (7700: 230)

An introduction to language science and the study of the language acquisition process. The characteristics and explanations of language development will be presented.

Introduction to Hearing and Speech Science (7700: 215)

Introductory course covering the human hearing system and acoustics of hearing as well as principles involved in the production, transmission, and reception of the speech signal.

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Oklahoma

Oklahoma State University

Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism (CDIS 3203)

Structure and function of the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and neural systems involved in the oral communication processes.

Phonetics (CDIS 3313)

The analysis and description of speech at the segmental and suprasegmental levels. Development of students' perceptual and analytical skills in speech sound production. Practice using the International Phonetic Alphabet for broad and narrow transcription. Overview of the speech production mechanism and process.

Speech and Language Development (CDIS 2223)

Discussion of current theories and research on typical language development over the lifespan. Normal acquisition of language (e.g. phonology); speech and language milestones; biological, cognitive, and social bases; description of dialect variations, second language acquisition; atypical language development; and relationship between spoken and written language.

Speech Science (CDIS 4313)

Scientific bases of the acoustic parameters, the perceptual and productive processes of speech, and the interrelationships of those factors during speech communication.

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Oregon

Portland State University

Anatomy and Physiology of Speech and Swallowing (SPHR 371)

A study of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, phonatory, and articulatory systems for speech, with applications to speech disorders. The physiology of swallowing and swallowing disorders is also covered.

Phonetics and Acoustics (SPHR 370)

A study of sounds used in speech, their acoustic properties, and their transcription utilizing the IPA; description of sounds, their symbolic nature, their production, and physical and psychological problems involved in their perception. The acoustical bases of speech and hearing will also be addressed.

Speech and Language Development in Children (SPHR 372)

Provides students with a foundation of knowledge regarding basic processes of language acquisition. In addition to the study of normal language development from a theoretical, developmental, and clinical perspective, related areas of study include cognition, social interactions, play, and literacy. Bilingual and multicultural issues are also addressed.

Hearing Sciences (SPHR 487)

Introductory course in audiology emphasizing basic acoustics and psychoacoustics, anatomy and physiology of the ear, hearing measurement, and types and causes of hearing impairment.

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Pennsylvania

La Salle University

A & P of Speech and Hearing Mechanisms (COSD 202)

This course is designed to give students a basic understanding of the structural organization (anatomy), function (physiology), and neural control for speech production and hearing. The course will emphasize both normal and disordered systems.

Language Development (COSD 203)

This course explores the specific nature, sequence, and patterns of language development from birth through adolescence and its relation to other aspects of child development. Conditions that place infants and children at risk for speech and language disorders are explored. Patterns of normal language development are discussed as a guide for the evaluation and treatment of children with developmental language disorders.

Phonetics (COSD 200)

This course involves the exploration and study of American English pronunciation through the application of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). Students will be trained in transcription of English phonemes and allophones and introduced to distinctive feature analysis, phonological rules, prosodic features, and dynamics of articulation, American dialectical variants, and developmental phonology.

Acoustics Bases of Speech and Hearing (COSD 211)

This course explores the physical characteristics of speech sounds and the psychophysical processes involved in hearing and speech perception. Sound waves, resonance, decibels, and spectrogram reading are discussed. Computer applications with practical implications are explored.

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Tennessee

East Tennessee State University

A & P of the Speech and Hearing Systems (CDIS 4037/5037)

A study of the basic anatomy and physiology of speech/hearing mechanisms. Theories and mechanisms of speech production and hearing will also be covered.

Language Development (CDIS 4060)

A study of the psycholinguistic aspects of language including cultural influences, the complex nature of language, the language-learning process, and the strategies involved analyzing normal child communication.

Speech and Hearing Science I (CDIS 4017)

A study of the basic theories, physics, and acoustics of speech production. Information pertaining to the anatomy and physiology of spoken language are also presented. This course provides a laboratory experience that includes an introduction the International Phonetic Alphabet and transcriptions of speech from typical speakers with different regional dialects.

Speech and Hearing Science II (CDIS 4027)

A study of the physiologic acoustics of the auditory periphery, neurophysiology of the speech and hearing systems, and an introduction to research tools in speech and hearing science. The laboratory portion of the course provides interactive demonstrations pertaining to the physiologic acoustics of the auditory periphery, neurophysiology of the speech and hearing systems, and an introduction to instrumentation used in speech and hearing science.

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Virginia

Longwood University

A & P of Speech and Hearing Impaired (CSDS 313)

Anatomical structures of the human communication system and the physiology of inter-related movement.

Language Development Across Life Span (CSDS 285)

An introduction to the normal acquisition of language, including the components of language, the physical, social, and cognitive bases for language, theories of language development, and how language evolves from infancy through adulthood. Cultural influences on language development will also be explored.

Phonetics (CSDS 307)

The phonetic structure of the English Language, its dialects and derivations; clinical application of the International Phonetic Alphabet

Speech Science (CSDS 450)

An introduction to speech science theory, instrumentation, and measurement. Emphasis on normal speech perception and production.

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Vermont

University of Vermont

UGR Human Anatomy & Physiology (ANPS 019)

Two-semester lecture course with credit given upon completion of each semester. Structure and function of human body will be presented in a three lecture/week format with an additional online lab component.

Development of Spoken Language (CSD 094)

Speech and language acquisition interpreted in light of current learning and cognitive theory, linguistic theory, and methods of linguistic analysis.

Clinical Phonetics (CSD 122)

Transcription of speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Speech sound disorders, development, universals, dialects, coarticulation, connected speech, prosody and second-language learning.

Speech and Hearing Science (CSD 101)

Structure and function of the respiratory, phonatory, articulatory, and hearing systems, coupled with models of speech and hearing as part of human communication.

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Wisconsin

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

A & P of Speech and Hearing (CSD 256)

Anatomy and physiology of the speech mechanism (respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation) and of hearing, including the related neurology.

Normal Communication Development (CSD 257)

Theoretical foundation for normal communication development, including prerequisites, extra-linguistic variables, processes/constraints, and the major language system components. Language variables presented by select populations and a profile perspective are presented

Phonetics: Theory and Application (CSD 262)

Study of the phonological system of language. Emphasis on phonemic and phonetic analysis and transcription of standard, nonstandard, and deviant speech.

Speech and Hearing Science (CSD 353)

This course will introduce students to basic acoustics, psychoacoustics, and acoustics of voice and speech production. Lecture, discussion and labs will be used in instruction.

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